How To Write a Press Release

Most people think that writing a press release is very difficult - but intact you can do it in 6 easy steps:
hk-english-writing-proofreading-copywriting-hong-kong

Communicate the 5 W's and the H. Who, what, when, where, why, and how.
  1. What is the actual news?
  2. Why this is news.
  3. The people, products, items, dates and other things related with the news.
  4. The purpose behind the news.
  5. Your company, city, state
  6. Any quotes/testimonials
Its very important that the press release is written in 3rd person journalistic style.

Of course the best way to have a Press Release written is to engage the services of a professional, native English writer. HKEnglish.com provides high quality
English Language Press Release Writing, Copywriting and Editing services in Hong Kong

Business Presentations and Public Speeches - Audience and Visuals

Business Presentations and Public Speeches - Audience and Visuals

Audience
There are far more types of audiences than there are types of presentations because audiences are made up of people and people come in innumerable flavors. Individuals could be invited to speak to groups all across the country. What the individual says and how they may say it depends on the makeup of those groups. They may ask you the individual to address a room full of factory operations managers who have no choice but to attend their talk, you they may go before a congressional committee looking into various environmental issues. When an individual stands up to deliver a presentation before an audience, its essential that the audience know who the presenter is, why they are there, what specifically they expect to get from your presentation, and how they will react to your message. You wont always be able to determine these factors, but you should try to gather as much background information as possible before your presentation. There will be times, especially with presentations that are open to the public, when you will only be able to guess.
Audiences can be classified into
four basic categories:
  1. Captives
  2. Pragmatists
  3. Socially motivated
  4. Committed

Visuals
A study done by Wharton School Of Business showed that the use of visuals reduced meeting times by 28 percent. Another study found that audiences believe presenters who use visuals are more professional and credible than presenters who merely speak. Other research indicates that meetings and presentations reinforced with visuals help participants reach decisions and consensus more quickly.
A presentation program, such as Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple Keynote, OpenOffice.org Impress or Prezi, is often used to generate the presentation content. Modern internet-based presentation software, such as the presentation application in Google Docs and SlideRocket also allow presentations to be developed collaboratively by geographically disparate collaborators. Presentation viewers such as SlideDog can be used to combine content from different presentation programs into one presentation.

Source: Wikipedia

Negotiation styles in Hong Kong and China

Negotiation styles
R.G. Shell identified five styles/responses to negotiation.[5] Individuals can often have strong dispositions towards numerous styles; the style used during a negotiation depends on the context and the interests of the other party, among other factors. In addition, styles can change over time.

Accommodating:
Individuals who enjoy solving the other party’s problems and preserving personal relationships. Accommodators are sensitive to the emotional states, body language, and verbal signals of the other parties. They can, however, feel taken advantage of in situations when the other party places little emphasis on the relationship.

Avoiding:
Individuals who do not like to negotiate and don’t do it unless warranted. When negotiating, avoiders tend to defer and dodge the confrontational aspects of negotiating; however, they may be perceived as tactful and diplomatic.

Collaborating:
Individuals who enjoy negotiations that involve solving tough problems in creative ways. Collaborators are good at using negotiations to understand the concerns and interests of the other parties. They can, however, create problems by transforming simple situations into more complex ones.

Competing:
Individuals who enjoy negotiations because they present an opportunity to win something. Competitive negotiators have strong instincts for all aspects of negotiating and are often strategic. Because their style can dominate the bargaining process, competitive negotiators often neglect the importance of relationships.

Compromising:
Individuals who are eager to close the deal by doing what is fair and equal for all parties involved in the negotiation. Compromisers can be useful when there is limited time to complete the deal; however, compromisers often unnecessarily rush the negotiation process and make concessions too quickly.

Types of Negotiators
Three basic kinds of negotiators have been identified by researchers involved in The Harvard Negotiation Project. These types of negotiators are:
Soft bargainers, hard bargainers, and principled bargainers.

Soft.
These people see negotiation as too close to competition, so they choose a gentle style of bargaining. The offers they make are not in their best interests, they yield to others’ demands, avoid confrontation, and they maintain good relations with fellow negotiators. Their perception of others is one of friendship, and their goal is agreement. They do not separate the people from the problem, but are soft on both. They avoid contests of wills and will insist on agreement, offering solutions and easily trusting others and changing their opinions.

Hard.
These people use contentious strategies to influence, utilising phrases such as “this is my final offer” and “take it or leave it.” They make threats, are distrustful of others, insist on their position, and apply pressure to negotiate. They see others as adversaries and their ultimate goal is victory. Additionally, they will search for one single answer, and insist you agree on it. They do not separate the people from the problem (as with soft bargainers), but they are hard on both the people involved and the problem.

Principled.
Individuals who bargain this way seek integrative solutions, and do so by sidestepping commitment to specific positions. They focus on the problem rather than the intentions, motives, and needs of the people involved. They separate the people from the problem, explore interests, avoid bottom lines, and reach results based on standards (which are independent of personal will). They base their choices on objective criteria rather than power, pressure, self interest, or an arbitrary decisional procedure. These criteria may be drawn from moral standards, principles of fairness, professional standards, tradition, and so on.

Researchers from The Harvard Negotiation Project recommend that negotiators explore a number of alternatives to the problems they are facing in order to come to the best overall conclusion/solution, but this is often not the case (as when you may be dealing with an individual utilizing soft or hard bargaining tactics) (Forsyth, 2010).

Source: Wikip[edia

Negotiation tactics

Negotiation tactics

There are many different ways to categorise the essential elements of negotiation.

One view of negotiation involves three basic elements: process, behaviour and substance. The process refers to how the parties negotiate: the context of the negotiations, the parties to the negotiations, the tactics used by the parties, and the sequence and stages in which all of these play out. Behaviour refers to the relationships among these parties, the communication between them and the styles they adopt. The substance refers to what the parties negotiate over: the agenda, the issues (positions and - more helpfully - interests), the options, and the agreement(s) reached at the end.

Another view of negotiation comprises four elements: strategy, process, tools, and tactics. Strategy comprises the top level goals - typically including relationship and the final outcome. Processes and tools include the steps that will be followed and the roles taken in both preparing for and negotiating with the other parties. Tactics include more detailed statements and actions and responses to others' statements and actions. Some add to this persuasion and influence, asserting that these have become integral to modern day negotiation success, and so should not be omitted.

Adversary or partner?
The two basically different approaches to negotiating will require different tactics. In the distributive approach each negotiator is battling for the largest possible piece of the pie, so it may be quite appropriate - within certain limits - to regard the other side more as an adversary than a partner and to take a somewhat harder line. This would however be less appropriate if the idea were to hammer out an arrangement that is in the best interest of both sides. A good agreement is not one with maximum gain, but optimum gain. This does not by any means suggest that we should give up our own advantage for nothing. But a cooperative attitude will regularly pay dividends. What is gained is not at the expense of the other, but with him.[2]

Employing an advocate
A skilled negotiator may serve as an advocate for one party to the negotiation. The advocate attempts to obtain the most favourable outcomes possible for that party. In this process the negotiator attempts to determine the minimum outcome(s) the other party is (or parties are) willing to accept, then adjusts their demands accordingly. A "successful" negotiation in the advocacy approach is when the negotiator is able to obtain all or most of the outcomes their party desires, but without driving the other party to permanently break off negotiations, unless the best alternative to a negotiated agreement (BATNA) is acceptable.

Skilled negotiators may use a variety of tactics ranging from negotiation hypnosis,[citation needed] to a straightforward presentation of demands or setting of preconditions, to more deceptive approaches such as cherry picking. Intimidation and salami tactics may also play a part in swaying the outcome of negotiations.[citation needed]
Another negotiation tactic is bad guy/good guy. Bad guy/good guy is when one negotiator acts as a bad guy by using anger and threats. The other negotiator acts as a good guy by being considerate and understanding. The good guy blames the bad guy for all the difficulties while trying to get concessions and agreement from the opponent.
Another negotiation is leaning back and whispering. This establishes a dominant physical position thus intimidating your counterpart.

The Getting to YES approach
Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In is a best-selling 1981 non-fiction book by Roger Fisher and William L. Ury. Reissued in 1991 with additional authorship credit to Bruce Patton, the book made appearances for years on Business Weeks "Best Seller" list. The book suggests a method called "principled negotiation or negotiation of merits." This method consists of four main steps: separating the people from the problem; focusing on interests, not positions; generating a variety of possibilities before deciding what to do; and insisting that the result be based on some objective standard.

Source: Wikipedia

Negotiation strategies

Negotiation strategies

Negotiation can take a wide variety of forms, from a trained negotiator acting on behalf of a particular organization or position in a formal setting, to an informal negotiation between friends. Negotiation can be contrasted with mediation, where a neutral third party listens to each side's arguments and attempts to help craft an agreement between the parties. It can also be compared with arbitration, which resembles a legal proceeding. In arbitration, both sides make an argument as to the merits of their case and the arbitrator decides the outcome.
Negotiation theorists generally distinguish between two types of negotiation. Different theorists use different labels for the two general types and distinguish them in different ways.

Distributive negotiation
Distributive negotiation is also sometimes called positional or hard-bargaining negotiation. It tends to approach negotiation on the model of haggling in a market. In a distributive negotiation, each side often adopts an extreme position, knowing that it will not be accepted, and then employs a combination of guile, bluffing, and brinksmanship in order to cede as little as possible before reaching a deal. Distributive bargainers conceive of negotiation as a process of distributing a fixed amount of value.

The term distributive implies that there is a finite amount of the thing being distributed or divided among the people involved. Sometimes this type of negotiation is referred to as the distribution of a “fixed pie.” There is only so much to go around, but the proportion to be distributed is variable. Distributive negotiation is also sometimes called win-lose because of the assumption that one person's gain results in another person's loss. A distributive negotiation often involves people who have never had a previous interactive relationship, nor are they likely to do so again in the near future. Simple everyday examples would be buying a car or a house.

Integrative negotiation
Integrative negotiation is also sometimes called interest-based or principled negotiation. It is a set of techniques that attempts to improve the quality and likelihood of negotiated agreement by providing an alternative to traditional distributive negotiation techniques. While distributive negotiation assumes there is a fixed amount of value (a “fixed pie”) to be divided between the parties, integrative negotiation often attempts to create value in the course of the negotiation (“expand the pie”). It focuses on the underlying interests of the parties rather than their arbitrary starting positions, approaches negotiation as a shared problem rather than a personalized battle, and insists upon adherence to objective, principled criteria as the basis for agreement.[1]
The word integrative implies some cooperation. Integrative negotiation often involves a higher degree of trust and the forming of a relationship. It can also involve creative problem-solving that aims to achieve mutual gains. It is also sometimes called win-win negotiation. (See Win-win game.)

A number of different approaches to integrative negotiation are taught in a variety of different books and programs. See, for example, Getting to YES, Mutual Gains Approach, Program on Negotiation, Gould Negotiation and Mediation Teaching Program. Scholars who have contributed to the field of negotiation include Roger Fisher and William Ury; Holly Schroth and Timothy Dayonot at UC Berkeley; Gerard E. Watzke at Tulane University; Sara Cobb at George Mason University; Len Riskin at the University of Missouri; Howard Raiffa at Harvard, Robert McKersie and Lawrence Susskind at MIT; Adil Najam and Jeswald Salacuse at The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy; and John D. Males.

Source: Wikipedia

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Understanding Corporate Culture



By:Debra Thorsen


Culture: n 1. natural phenomenon that is created whenever a group of people come together to collaborate; 2. foundation for all decisions and actions within an organization; 3. the way things are around here.

Every time people come together with a shared purpose, culture is created. This group of people could be a family, neighborhood, project team, or company. Culture is automatically created out of the combined thoughts, energies, and attitudes of the people in the group.

I often compare culture to electricity. Culture is an energy force that becomes woven through the thinking, behavior, and identity of those within the group. Culture is powerful and invisible and its manifestations are far reaching. Culture determines a company’s dress code, work environment, work hours, rules for getting ahead and getting promoted, how the business world is viewed, what is valued, who is valued, and much more.

Culture shows up in both visible and invisible ways. Some manifestations of this energy field called "culture" are easy to observe. You can see the dress code, work environment, perks, and titles in a company. This is the surface layer of culture. These are only some of the visible manifestations of a culture.

The far more powerful aspects of culture are invisible. The cultural core is composed of the beliefs, values, standards, paradigms, worldviews, moods, internal conversations, and private conversations of the people that are part of the group. This is the foundation for all actions and decisions within a team, department, or organization.

Visible Manifestations of Culture
·Dress Code
·Work Environment
·Benefits
·Perks
·Conversations
·Work/Life Balance
·Titles & Job Descriptions
·Organizational Structure
·Relationships

Invisible Manifestations of Culture
·Values
·Private Conversations (with self or confidants)
·Invisible Rules
·Attitudes
·Beliefs
·Worldviews
·Moods and Emotions
·Unconscious Interpretations
·Standards
·Paradims
·Assumptions

Business leaders often assume that their company's vision, values, and strategic priorities are synonymous with their company's culture. Unfortunately, too often, the vision, values, and strategic priorities may only be words hanging on a plaque on the wall.

In a thriving profitable company, employees will embody the values, vision, and strategic priorities of their company. What creates this embodiment (or lack of embodiment) is the culture that permeates the employees' psyches, bodies, conversations, and actions.

The energy fields that make up a group's culture are dynamic and change continuously. Culture is created and constantly reinforced on a daily basis through conversations, symbols, rituals, written materials, and body language. It is the small, mundane actions and behaviors that create a culture and can shift a culture.

Creating and sustaining a healthy, vibrant culture requires reinforcement of the culture through daily and proactive conversations and communications. The failure to discuss the values, purpose, and rules within a group often leads to a culture that is at cross purposes with the stated intention of the group. Poor communication creates a lot of confusion and often a crisis of meaninglessness.

Since a culture is created every time a group of people come together to form a team, a company will have many sub-cultures that exist within its main culture. For example, the marketing and technology teams may have different worldviews, jargon, work hours, and ways to do things. A big challenge for today's company is to create a strong, cohesive corporate culture that pulls all of the sub-cultures together and ensures that they can work as a unified team.

Most companies try to "fix" perceived problems by addressing the parts of the corporate culture that are easy to see. Some quick-fixes include holding Friday beer bashes and company picnics or adding fringe benefits and perks. None of these actions will have a powerful or lasting effect on a company's culture.

So, if the powerful part of culture is invisible, how can you affect it? Through conversation. Conversations have the power to make the invisible visible. Language is not merely descriptive, it is generative. Language and conversations have the power to generate a new, powerful future and to create a cultural energy field that will support and sustain this future.

The CEO and leadership team of a company have a powerful impact on culture through their conversations and behaviors. Business leaders can pro-actively create a thriving culture by understanding what culture is (and is not) and learning how to have fundamental business conversations.

Unfortunately, most business leaders receive little to no education on how to have powerful conversations that generate culture and actions. Culture building can be learned, but it takes an honest commitment from the leadership team of an organization.

Find out how to shift your corporate culture to increase profits and retain employees. Visit www.culturebuilders.com for free articles and white papers on corporate culture.






UNDERSTANDING CORPORATE CULTURE

Business English And Its Importance To Business And Professional Success


By Maria Eliza Raymundo

What is Business English?
Loosely defined, Business English refers to the English language used in international trade or business. It is a specialized area of the English language learning and teaching because it is largely attributed to non-native English speakers who study the subject to enhance their chances of doing business with companies from English speaking countries.
Largely depending on the intention for which learning is intended, Business English can refer to the study of business English vocabulary used in the fields of trade, business, finance, or international relations. If the study focuses on techniques on business presentations, negotiations, correspondence, writing and other kills needed for business communications, then it can be classified as the study of Business English communication skills in the workplace. There is really not much difference between the two classifications, as vocabulary and communication skills work together to achieve a common goal - to develop or enhance both written and verbal English skills for business or career advancement purposes.
Why Learning Business English Is Important
Around the world, there is an estimated 1 Billion people learning English. Many factors point to the reason why learning English has seen exponential growth in recent years, but it all boils down to the English language being the "global language" of business, politics, international relations, culture, and entertainment for so many countries worldwide. And that is just an understatement as in fact, while English is not an official language in many countries worldwide, it is the language most often taught as a foreign or second language.
Business Leverage
The rapid growth in technology for global communications notwithstanding, there are still many companies and individual professionals who fail in their quest for business or professional success. And oftentimes the failure primarily lies on one of the most basic foundations of making business relations - the language spoken. Undoubtedly, the English language is the global language for business and having a good command of English will definitely give one who is eyeing globally competitive business or career a clear edge. Any communications problem, whether personal or business, translates to losses, zero result in negotiations, incompetence for global business, or will just simply leave you ill-equipped to carry out international business.
Career Growth
Going down on a more personal level of career success, having the right Business English communication skills will surely equip you with a liberating confidence and ability to express yourself in the English language. It will surely be an advantage in interviews, thus giving you more opportunities to widen your career prospects. Or if you are not looking for a new job, having the confidence and ability to speak Business English is one way of enhancing your potential for earning by making you stand out for career advancement or promotions. Studies show a steady growth in the number of companies worldwide requiring employees who have bilingual skills.
Internet Proficiency Means English Proficiency
Research shows that 80% of the amount of Internet web content is in the English language and that content relating to business written in the English language largely comprises this figure. It goes without saying that having a good grasp of business information, data, or terminologies in the English language is very important to have a good understanding of the wealth of business information available on the Internet.
Maria Eliza Raymundo is a Virtual Assistant who contributes for PowerUp English [http://www.powerupenglish.com] and for the Business English Is Not Enough [http://www.powerupenglish.com/blog] blog.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Maria_Eliza_Raymundo

10 Tips for Writing Effective Business Emails

by Ian Nock

Email communication has a pivotal role in business communication. The following tips will help you to make your email communication efficient and effective.

1. A Meaningful subject line
People receive a huge number of emails are present in the mailboxes every day. To get your email noticed among them, it is important to give your email a subject line that grabs the attention of the receiver. The subject should also associate closely to the content of the email. When replying remember to change the subject line rather than just let the mail program add “Re:” at the front.

2. Cue it right
It is important to send the mail to the right recipients. No one wants to receive emails in their inbox that really do not concern them. You should use the cc and bcc options only where it is important. Moreover, emails should have a personalised touch to make people relate to them more.

3. Grammatically correct
It is very annoying for people to find mistakes in an email. That is why you should proofread your email after completing it to correct grammar and check spelling. The use of incorrect grammar would only reduce the reputation of your organisation and yourself in the eyes of the recipient.

4. Simple and concise
The attention span of people is limited and they want to be able to read emails quickly. Therefore, use simple and plain English as much as possible in your emails. For example use “buy” instead of “purchase”. Avoid clichés such as “last but not least” and legalese such as “in reference to” and “please contact the undersigned”.

5. Appropriate Format
Your email should not have all the text in just a single paragraph as this makes it difficult for a reader to understand your meaning. Also avoid long and complex sentences with multiple clauses. Organise the content of your message logically and include bullet points, headings and subheadings for clarity.

6. Appropriate Diction
Words like urgent and important are meant for grabbing the attention of the reader. If these words are used unnecessarily, it will only contribute to making your email seem worthless to recipients. Therefore, use urgent sparingly and resort to other such words only when absolutely necessary.

7. Know the target audience
It is important that you know whom your email is supposed to convince and target. For this purpose, you should know your audience well and must have a clear idea of what they are anticipating before you start writing them an email.

8. Use of links and attachments
The effective use of attachments and hyperlinks helps you communicate your message in an efficient manner and allows your email to be concise. Use links rather than copying and pasting large sections of text.

9. Give a deadline for reply
If a reply to your email is required, then the email should clearly state the deadline for the respondent to reply. This makes it easy for the receiver to understand what actions are intended.

10. A clear action call
If your email requires the reader to perform some action or task, then the call to action should be clear and simple. Mention it more than once, so that the reader does not miss it out.

HK English runs
Business English EmaiL Writing Courses and Workshops in Hong Kong (HK).

Register for the Business English Email Writing Course (HK) here

Ten Tips For Better Business Writing

Ten Tips For Better Business Writing

Have you ever read an email or memo you did not understand? Have you had to read and read again the same paragraph to grasp its meaning? Do you worry that others may not be able to understand what your writing is about?

The purpose of any piece of writing is to communicate information to your readers. Here are 10 top tips to make your writing clearer and more understandable.

1. Plan your writing for your readers
2. Put the most important information at the beginning
3. Use short, understandable modern words instead of long, complicated old ones
4. Use short sentences
5. Get rid of unnecessary words, information and sentences
6. Avoid using jargon and technical terms
7. Don't use clichés such as "Please be advised that"
8. Use active verbs instead of the passive voice
9. Format information in lists and use bullet points
10. Insert tables and graphs into text rather than writing lengthy descriptions.

Also know your target audience. Who is going to read your writing and why? Do you know what is important to them?
 
Click for more information on how to write better business English

What are Soft Skills and Why are they so Important?

What are Soft Skills and Why are they so Important?  by: ILead India

Most people are still not clear about what soft skills mean. Frankly, the term itself was coined just a few years ago. In any job, the sole importance was given to the candidate’s resume and what his qualifications were. But nowadays, a lot of stress is being laid on the candidate’s soft skills and if he is properly trained in them.

So what are soft skills? It is hard to be exact in this case, but it essentially is a method to judge a person’s performance, leadership ability, and team spirit. Hard skills constitute your educational qualifications and previous job experience. In fact, a lot of recruiters are now paying more attention to soft skills rather than the hard ones. A lot of candidates with impressive resumes but poor soft skills have been rejected in the final rounds of interviews.

That is why you should enroll in soft skills programs in order to develop these skills better. Soft skills can be classified into these categories:

• Negotiation – This is a very crucial soft skill that you need to possess. The art of negotiating a deal with a client or even negotiating with a co-worker is something that you need to master effectively. There is no hard and fast rule about mastering this aspect but you will be trained to negotiate to the fullest of your capabilities.

• Team building – Instilling team spirit in the members of a team is perhaps the most difficult task ever. Ego, personal rivalry, office politics, and various other factors come into play and you have to overcome all these hurdles and utilize all the resources efficiently. This is known as team building and it requires some training beforehand.

• Communication – Last but not the least, you need to communicate well with your superiors and peers. If you can’t express your thoughts or grievances in the proper manner, then it will soon begin to affect your performance. Honing this particular soft skill is all the more important when you are talking to clients of the company.

Looking for an institute that offers soft skills training in Kolkata There are quite a few reputed ones that are providing such training for extremely reasonable fees so it should not be difficult for you to register your name. Just make sure that the institute has a good name in the market and also if it offers good job placements after the completion of the course.
About The Author
iLead India has prolific writers who write on a wide range of topics pertaining to education, including higher studies, post graduate courses, academic institutions, MBA education and more.

The author invites you to visit:
http://www.ilead.net.in

Article Source:
http://www.articlecity.com/articles/education/article_2519.shtml

How to Write an Excellent Business Letter

How to Write an Excellent Business Letter

By Jean Taylor
Although the layout of a letter is important and familiarity with the standard layout helps us to get down to work quickly and methodically, the actual letter we write is the most important activity. We have to say what we want to say as clearly and concisely as possible. If this is the first letter we have written on the matter, we want to start with the maximum impact. If it is one in a chain of letters, we want to recall to our correspondent's mind all that has gone before and update him/her by a further piece or pieces of information.
It is advisable before starting the letter to jot down the points to be made and to number them so they are in the best order. If the letter is to be dictated, it is particularly important to be well-organized, with all the bits of information you need to dictate. A secretary will not be impressed by an executive who does not know the surname of the correspondent, or his/her initials, or the address, and who hesitates over the dictation, searching for odd scraps of paper in pockets, handbags, etc. If dictation is to a machine, the machine has to be told everything, so that the audio-typist can get on with the letter without delay. While a secretary can perhaps look at past correspondence for missing details, the audio-typist is remote from the scene of operations and possibly in a completely different building.
The opening paragraph
The opening paragraph tends to be short and often continues the greeting begun in the salutation if we are on familiar terms with our correspondent. In more formal situations it outlines the subject matter of the letter, reinforcing the subject-heading. It may refer to earlier correspondence, and it always sets the tone of the letter. Thus a letter was intended to make the strongest possible protest about the products or services supplied by the correspondent would not begin in a light-hearted way, but would start seriously and formally. By contrast, a letter acknowledging a large order and anticipating a long and fruitful course of dealings with a customer would begin pleasantly and keep a friendly tone throughout.
The main subject matter
The body of the letter would consist of one or more paragraphs, each dealing with a topic that is an element in the subject matter to be dealt with. Paragraphs should not be too long, unless the subject matter is particularly serious and can sustain the reader's interest because of its urgent nature. If a series of important points is being made, they may be listed (a), (b), (c), etc,. Or if they have a paragraph each, the paragraphs may be numbered. It is in this part of the letter that the writer must explain what he/she feels about the matter, and what he/she feels the next step should be. If detailed recommendations are being made, they may be listed in the final paragraph so that the correspondent can deal with them item by item. Generally speaking, a final paragraph that shows the way ahead (even if the best way ahead is to do nothing) leaves your correspondent with a clear guideline for the future.
Jean Taylor More FREE sample business letters visit
http://www.101businessletter.com
Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Jean_Taylor

Business English and your path to career success

The term business English covers a variety of topics. in Hong Kong, however, it is the language used to communicate both internally and externally within an organisation.

Currently it is estimated that there are over 1 billion people learning English right now. 250 million of these are in China! Why is this so? Because English is the "global language" of business, politics, culture and entertainment. Your ability to use English well within the workplace will make or break your career success. And the better your English the more relaxed you will be in your daily working life.

The CEO's of the Fortune 500 companies are all great communicators. They can deliver powerful presentations and sell their ideas to everyone they come into contact with. Here I will ask you one question: How good are you at communicating in English in your business life?

Apart from face to face communication in meetings there are the teleconferences where its even more difficult to understand what is being said because there is no body language. No nods indicating "yes" or smiles to say " I agree with you".

And even worse are the business dinner or drinks after the meeting.... What are you going to say? How are you going to understand what they are saying now that they are using so much slang? And or course the loud music doesn't help you listen more clearly either.... Why is that Scottish accent so difficult to understand? Oh dear......

Being proficient in English will also help you in job interviews and enable you to move ahead in your career, or even change direction.

At a lower level you will be able to get away with communicating in Cantonese (or whatever your native language is) with your colleagues, and the grammar mistakes in your emails will be overlooked. But the more senior you become the more you will have to show your abilities in English. Suddenly you have to deal with the big guys from head office in London. And you wouldn't want your staff to criticise your business emails would you?

The most efficient way to improve your English to with a private one to one native English tutor. But not all "native English tutors" are qualified or experienced so beware. At "HKEnglish.com":http://www.hkenglish.com all our tutors are experienced, qualified native English tutors who will customise your English lessons to ensure that you are meeting your learning objectives.

We provides a range of
Business English Courses

Better Business Writing - Be Concise

Today, writing business emails, letters and reports is taking more and more of our time. And with multiple people in your organisation reading your emails you want to be sure that yours are as correct as possible.

To write effectively not only requires a good knowledge of grammar and a wide vocabulary, but also proper organisation of ideas and an understanding of tone.

The most important thing to realise is that "less is better". With less words your writing will be more easily understood. Being concise is one of the most important ways that you can improve your business writing. Here are some ways to reduce word count.

*Avoid Complicated Words*

One of the most common mistakes is to try and use longer, more complicated words and phrases when you could use a simpler alternative.

For instance:

*Replace "endevour" with "try"

*replace "terminate" with "end"

*Replace "at the present time" with "now"

*Replace "for the purpose of " with "for"


*Avoid Cliches*

Another popular error is the use of cliches. You have probably read these hundreds of times in emails/letters you have received and so copy them into your own writing. Cliches just add extra words to the text but don't add any further meaning.

Consider these:

*Replace "at an early date" with "soon"

*Replace "are in receipt of" with "received"

By using simpler words and phrases you will be certain that your reader will understand your message.

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