Interview Coaching - Interview Skills Course Methods in Hong Kong, HKSAR, China

  • Job Interview Coaching - Interview Skills Course Methods in Hong Kong (HK SAR), China

An abundance of information is available to instruct interviewees on strategies for improving their performance in a job interview. Information used by interviewees comes from a variety of sources ranging from popular how-to books to formal coaching programs, sometimes even provided by the hiring organisation. Within the more formal coaching programs, there are two general types of coaching.

One type of coaching is designed to teach interviewees how to perform better in the interview by focusing on how to behave and present oneself. This type of coaching is focused on improving aspects of the interview that are not necessarily related to the specific elements of performing the job tasks. This type of coaching could include how to dress, how to display nonverbal behaviours (head nods, smiling, eye contact), verbal cues (how fast to speak, speech volume, articulation, pitch), and impression management tactics.

Another type of coaching is designed to focus interviewees on the content specifically relevant to describing one’s qualifications for the job, in order to help improve their answers to interview questions. This coaching, therefore, focuses on improving the interviewee’s understanding of the skills, abilities, and traits the interviewer is attempting to assess, and responding with relevant experience that demonstrates these skills.
[70] For example, this type of coaching might teach an interviewee to use the STAR approach for answering behavioural interview questions. An example coaching program might include several sections focusing on various aspects of the interview. It could include a section designed to introduce interviewees to the interview process, and explain how this process works (e.g., administration of interview, interview day logistics, different types of interviews, advantages of structured interviews). It could also include a section designed to provide feedback to help the interviewee to improve their performance in the interview, as well as a section involving practice answering example interview questions. An additional section providing general interview tips about how to behave and present oneself could also be included.[71]

It is useful to consider coaching in the context of the competing goals of the interviewer and interviewee. The interviewee’s goal is typically to perform well (i.e. obtain high interview ratings), in order to get hired. On the other hand, the interviewer’s goal is to obtain job-relevant information, in order to determine whether the applicant has the skills, abilities, and traits believed by the organization to be indicators of successful job performance.
[70]
Research has shown that how well an applicant does in the interview can be enhanced with coaching.
[70][72][73][74] The effectiveness of coaching is due, in part, to increasing the interviewee’s knowledge, which in turn results in better interview performance. Interviewee knowledge refers to knowledge about the interview, such as the types of questions that will be asked, and the content that the interviewer is attempting to assess.[75] Research has also shown that coaching can increase the likelihood that interviewers using a structured interview will accurately choose those individuals who will ultimately be most successful on the job (i.e., increase reliability and validity of the structured interview).[70] Additionally, research has shown that interviewees tend to have positive reactions to coaching, which is often an underlying goal of an interview.[71] Based on research thus far, the effects of coaching tend to be positive for both interviewees and interviewers.

References
70. Maurer, T., Solamon, J., & Lippstreu, M. (2008). How does coaching interviewees affect the validity of a structured interview? Journal of Occupational Behavior, 29, 355–371.
71 Maurer, T. & Solamon, J. (2006). The science and practice of a structured employment interview coaching program. Personnel Psychology, 59, 431–454.
72 Campion, M. & Campion, J. (1987). Evaluation of an interviewee skills training program in a natural field experiment. Personnel Psychology, 40, 675–691.
73 Maurer, T., Solamon, J., Andrews, K., & Troxtel, D. (2001). Interviewee coaching, preparation strategies and response strategies in relation to performance in situational employment interviews: An extension of Maurer, Solamon & Troxtel (1998). Journal of Applied Psychology, 86, 709–717.
74 Maurer, T., Solamon, J., & Troxtel, D. (1998). Relationship of coaching with performance in situational employment interviews. Journal of Applied Psychology, 83, 128–136.
75. Tross, S. & Maurer, T. (2008). The effect of coaching interviewees on subsequent interview performance in structure esperience-based interviews. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 81, 589–605.

Source: Wikipedia